The Littlest Things: Cold Mornings

It’s true that a good morning can lead to a good day. Mornings are cold. The body loses heat at night while we sleep, so that we don’t burn up more energy.

The littlest things can make the biggest difference. The butterfly effect is a real thing. Here I provide examples.

Some context – You might know that in the last few months, I had a massive change of schedule. I am no longer required or bound to dedicate a strict time slot to an occupation. At first, I liked the flexibility of the whole thing, but the lack of people around and little work to do was a change I couldn’t handle much. So, I have been attempting to self-impose a strict time slot.

It’s true that a good morning can lead to a good day. I have found that waking up at a good time – latest by 8 AM, not early, not too late – allows me to function efficiently and happily throughout the day. Any later than that, and I am subject to bad moods, phantom pains and other psychological whatnots. Which is why I hate it when the littlest thing prevents me from doing so.

Mornings are cold. The body loses heat at night while we sleep, so that we don’t burn up more energy. That’s what rest is – a way to spend less energy than what your body can put out, giving the body a while to feel like it isn’t expending too much heat. It’s hard enough to not feel cold in the morning without:

  • The fan being on because your roommate wants it.
  • Your house being cold because it doesn’t get enough natural light.
  • Sleeping without a constricting tee shirt.

Now I drafted this back when I didn’t have the solution. Now I’ve started doing a number of things to fix it. I use two blankets to combat the fan, I’ve started aerating the house during the day to warm it up, and I either sleep with a tee on, or I use a thick vest.

Combined with a good alarm clock app (I’m up to solving 7 “Hardest” math problems on Alarm Clock Xtreme. Any less and I go back to sleep), I am able to get up with some accuracy.

Now if only I could sleep earlier, I’d accurately get up at 8 instead of accurately getting up at 11.

Thank you for reading.